Category Archives: Technology Transfer

Lessons from The Sound of Innovation: Lesson 1, On the Border

In The Sound of Innovation: Stanford and the Computer Music Revolution, Andrew J. Nelson recounts how John Chowning and others developed digital music while working in between the cracks of computer science, music, and electrical engineering. Nelson emphasizes this situation … Continue reading

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Bayh-Dole is a competition and technology transfer statute

The Bayh-Dole Coalition, a lobbying front for pharma and university patent administrators, claims that Bayh-Dole is a “tech transfer statute” that would be misused if federal agencies used its march-in provisions to address drug pricing. If companies cannot price-gouge, they … Continue reading

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Undermining Bayh-Dole by relying on it? 3

We are working through Niels Reimers’s op/ed in the Mercury News, published last April (2021) and now being used by the Bayh-Dole Coalition, a lobbying organization backed by a number of universities and front groups, to try to prevent Bayh-Dole’s … Continue reading

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Undermining Bayh-Dole by relying on it? 1

I feel like Charlie Chaplin in a pie factory. Before I could work through an op/ed by Niels Reimers in the Mercury News last April (2021) that the Bayh-Dole Coalition has dredged up to contest the use of march-in to … Continue reading

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Nicotine Patches, 4

Let’s review where we have got to in this dive into the history of nicotine patches. The UC did not transfer technology in the nicotine patch case. Ciba-Geigy did not need the UC technology–it seems to have wanted the patent … Continue reading

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Nicotine Patches, 3

Now for the University of California, Los Angeles. The Association of University Technology Managers (AUTM) wrote up the UC nicotine patch story with the headline “Turning Quitters Into Winners: The Nicotine Patch Success Story” as part of their “Better World … Continue reading

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Nicotine Patches, 2

We are working through the history of nicotine patches, to learn what we can from UC’s claim to have invented the nicotine patch, and AUTM’s claim that this is a success story, and the Bayh-Dole Coalition’s claim that this success … Continue reading

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What Bayh-Dole has stolen from us

In an article published August 29, 2021 in The Intercept, Alexander Zaitchik describes the passage of the Bayh-Dole Act as “The Great American Science Heist,” with the subtitle “How the Bayh-Dole Act Wrested Public Science From the People’s Hands.” He … Continue reading

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The use of the patent system for federal research results, 11: Safeguards that don’t guard

We have been working through Federal Security Agency order 110-1, which in 1952 introduced an agency-wide policy for inventions made in public health research. The core of the policy was to prefer open access for all such inventions, but then … Continue reading

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The use of the patent system for federal research results, 10: the drivers that eventually produce Bayh-Dole

There’s the version of the theory of patent rights that asserts that exclusionary practice is at the heart of the value of a patent, and any practice that declines to assert a patent wastes that value. This theory of exclusionary … Continue reading

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