Tag Archives: patents

Harbridge House on university exclusive licensing, 1

The Harbridge House report on government patent policy in 1968 laid the foundation for Bayh-Dole. Or, rather, federal officials selectively used portions of the report to change federal policy to conform to the wishes of patent development firms affiliated with … Continue reading

Posted in History, Policy, Technology Transfer | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Harbridge House on university exclusive licensing, 1

How can a startup protect their intellectual property without filing for a patent? 

I was asked to respond to another Quora question— How can a startup protect their intellectual property without filing for a patent? Tim Berry provides a really excellent answer at Quora. But I thought it would be worth it to … Continue reading

Posted in IP | Tagged , , | Comments Off on How can a startup protect their intellectual property without filing for a patent? 

A sense of proportion–1

“If life is going to exist in a universe this size, the one thing it cannot afford to have is a sense of proportion.” —Douglas Adams, Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy In the Bayh-Dole era–1981 to the present–the US Patent … Continue reading

Posted in Fun, History, Social Science | Tagged , | Comments Off on A sense of proportion–1

A century of reaping enormous profits at the expense of sickness and misfortune, 2

Mayo’s research publication Discovery’s Edge recently ran an article on “The Power of Patents.” In the article, Mayo Clinic wonders about patent royalties from a famous past invention: When Mayo Clinic colleagues Edward Kendall, Ph.D., and Philip Hench, M.D., along with … Continue reading

Posted in History, Policy | Tagged , , , | Comments Off on A century of reaping enormous profits at the expense of sickness and misfortune, 2

Hormones and Patents

Graham Dutfield at the University of Leeds has published an article on the development of medical hormone products and patent law, “Patent on Steroids: What Hormones Tell Us about the Evolution of Patent Law.” The article doesn’t do as much … Continue reading

Posted in History, Innovation | Tagged , , , | Comments Off on Hormones and Patents

NIST’s “substantially fueled” premise for unleashing innovation

Here is a claim from the opening of a recent NIST report–1234–on “Unleashing American Innovation,” a “draft green paper”: The U.S. innovation system is substantially fueled by the discoveries and inventions arising from federally funded R&D at the Nation’s universities, … Continue reading

Posted in Innovation, Metrics, Policy | Tagged , , , | Comments Off on NIST’s “substantially fueled” premise for unleashing innovation

The dogs in the manger, 2

We are working through some testimony from 1979 by a federal patent attorney, R. Tenney Johnson, before a Senate subcommittee considering a federal government invention policy bill that was a rival to Bayh-Dole (and strikingly similar, and didn’t pass). Johnson … Continue reading

Posted in Bayh-Dole, Bozonet, History | Tagged , , , , , | Comments Off on The dogs in the manger, 2

Guide to Bayh-Dole by the Layers, 7

Eighth layer: Outcomes We reach the eighth and final layer of Bayh-Dole: outcomes. We can consider four elements of outcomes: activity, cost, practical application, and the effects of patent monopoly exclusion on research, rapid industry and professional uptake of research … Continue reading

Posted in Bayh-Dole | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off on Guide to Bayh-Dole by the Layers, 7

Institutional patent derangement syndrome

The discussion of university ownership of patents on inventions made in faculty-led research invariably adopts the singular. Consider one invention at one university. Now, doesn’t it make sense that university administrators should take over that invention for the good of … Continue reading

Posted in Bozonet, Policy, Sponsored Research, Technology Transfer | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off on Institutional patent derangement syndrome

“Only assholes get patents…”

Slashdot points to a recent blog post by Marco Arment on dealing with feature copying and imitation in software apps. Arment summaries copyright and trademark angles, noting that neither provides much defense. He then moves on to patents: Only assholes … Continue reading

Posted in Bayh-Dole, Commons, Policy | Tagged , , , , , | Comments Off on “Only assholes get patents…”