Tag Archives: invention

How Bayh-Dole complicates the definitions in Stevenson-Wydler

The only law that Bayh-Dole does not expressly supersede is the Stevenson-Wydler Act. It’s worth comparing language in the two laws, as Bayh-Dole draws from Stevenson-Wydler, but then works its own magic. Consider the definition cascade on inventions. Here’s Stevenson-Wydler: … Continue reading

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Whistling all the way to the bank, revisited 2

The “Whistling” article struggles with the problem of the standard patent rights clause language about “electing to retain title.” I’ve wondered over this wording for years. It appears to be at the heart of the “cleverly crafted scheme” to intercept … Continue reading

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Whistling all the way to the bank, revisited 1

Back in 2010, I wrote an article titled “Whistling all the way to the bank.” The article explored the problem of compensation tied to the argument that the Bayh-Dole Act was a “vesting statute” that vested ownership of inventions made … Continue reading

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Bayh-Dole in another simple diagram

Bayh-Dole conflates three distinct forms of federal contracting for research and then moves one form–university-hosted research–into the category of another, procurement from commercial firms. Here’s the diagram:   The effect of Bayh-Dole is depicted by the blue arrows. The box … Continue reading

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Bayh-Dole the Monster

The Bayh-Dole Act makes a great deal about public interest. Throughout the law are gestures toward worthy objectives–use of inventions, manufacturing in the United States, government licenses, and the right of federal agencies to step if they need to. But … Continue reading

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The University of Michigan’s Mess of a Present Assignment, Part I

In reviewing university IP policies while I consider how a policy can come to transfer, as if by magic, IP from an author or inventor to a university merely by the assertion of university ownership, I came upon the following Form … Continue reading

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The First Principle of Bayh-Dole

Here is the First Principle of Bayh-Dole: A federal agency may not require the assignment to the federal government of an invention made with federal support at a nonprofit or small business if the inventors assign their patent rights to … Continue reading

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