Tag Archives: Bayh-Dole

Bayh-Dole the Giant Turd

Howard Forman, a patent attorney, introduced the claim that the federal government had 26,000 unused patents in his testimony before a House subcommittee in 1976, and that the reason for the nonuse was that the government made the inventions available … Continue reading

Posted in Bayh-Dole, Bozonet | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Five easy ways to circumvent Bayh-Dole’s “manufactured substantially” requirement

Bayh-Dole makes American manufacture of product based on subject inventions the centerpiece of the law. Bayh-Dole’s statement of policy and objective calls out promotion of inventions “made in the United States by United States industry and labor” (35 USC 200). … Continue reading

Posted in Bayh-Dole | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

NSF’s circumvention of Bayh-Dole in cooperative research centers

Bayh-Dole positions the “preference” for United States industry as the most important provision of the law, asserting precedence over any other part of Bayh-Dole (see 35 USC 203). Bayh-Dole requires owners of subject inventions to require certain exclusive licensees to … Continue reading

Posted in Bayh-Dole, Sponsored Research | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

What the NIH says about Bayh-Dole, 3

Now we arrive at the source of the NIH’s conflation in its most recent “background” misrepresentation of Bayh-Dole. We are deep into the federally owned invention side of Bayh-Dole, section 209(a), in a list of the requirements that must be … Continue reading

Posted in Bayh-Dole, Commons | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

What the NIH says about Bayh-Dole, 2

We are working through the NIH’s most recent misrepresentation of the Bayh-Dole Act. In the first part of this effort, we looked at the NIH’s bungling of the basic premise of Bayh-Dole and the concept of practical application. Bayh-Dole’s first … Continue reading

Posted in Bayh-Dole, Commons, Open Source | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

What about inventions made on equipment purchased with federal funds?

How does the Bayh-Dole Act apply to inventions made using equipment purchased with federal funding? Here’s the thing–Bayh-Dole applies to inventions owned by a contractor–a party to a federal funding agreement for research or development. If the inventor is not … Continue reading

Posted in Bayh-Dole | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

What the NIH says about Bayh-Dole, 1

The NIH has published comments on the NIST changes to the regulations that implement the Bayh-Dole Act and the standard patent rights clause. Jamie Love at Knowledge Ecology International calls out in a tweet a passage in the “Background” section in … Continue reading

Posted in Bayh-Dole, Open Source, Policy | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Patent agreements in Federal Procurement Regulations and Bayh-Dole, 2

If we return for a moment to O’Connor’s article–it is a great read for what it aims to do, but for O’Connor’s theme of abstract mistaken assumptions rather than providing a specific account of Latker’s lack of drafting ability–there is … Continue reading

Posted in Bayh-Dole, History, Policy, Sponsored Research, Stanford v Roche | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Patent agreements in Federal Procurement Regulations and Bayh-Dole, 1

Sean O’Connor starts an excellent article that gives a detailed account of history behind the Bayh-Dole Act (“Mistaken Assumptions: the Roots of Stanford v. Roche in Post-War Government Patent Policy“) this way: The Bayh-Dole Act of 1980 was built on a … Continue reading

Posted in Bayh-Dole, History | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Invention, subject invention, and the clever scheme of Bayh-Dole

Here is the definition of invention in the Kennedy executive branch patent policy, 1963 (Section 4(b)): Invention or Invention or discovery–includes any art, machine, manufacture, design, or composition of matter, or any new and useful improvement thereof, or any variety … Continue reading

Posted in Bayh-Dole, Sponsored Research, Stanford v Roche | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off on Invention, subject invention, and the clever scheme of Bayh-Dole