Category Archives: Policy

Mick Stadler writes a letter in 1976 on “effective transfer mechanisms”–2

We are working through Mick Stadler’s 1976 letter to Research Corporation’s Willard Marcy. Stadler outlines eight functions for a next generation “technology transfer mechanism.” The essentials of Stadler’s view are that the mechanism must distribute technology widely, must be distributed, … Continue reading

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Mick Stadler writes a letter in 1976 on “effective transfer mechanisms”–1

On June 29, 1976 Mick Stadler wrote a letter to Willard Marcy, the Vice President of Research Corporation’s Patent Program. Stadler, at the time was assistant director of the Case Western Reserve technology transfer program. He would go on to … Continue reading

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Harbridge House on university exclusive licensing, 2

There’s one more thing raised by the Harbridge House report–the metrics on those patent development firms. Patent applications are filed on approximately 10 to 15 percent of the disclosures submitted and, if present circumstances continue, only one-quarter of these patents … Continue reading

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Harbridge House on university exclusive licensing, 1

The Harbridge House report on government patent policy in 1968 laid the foundation for Bayh-Dole. Or, rather, federal officials selectively used portions of the report to change federal policy to conform to the wishes of patent development firms affiliated with … Continue reading

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Patents in Space-4

Famiya Masood, a columnist for a Pakistani newspaper, argues in a recent article that government-funded research at universities in Pakistan is not “translating into inventions that can be eventually patented.” Masood seems to believe that this is not a good … Continue reading

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Patents in Space-2

Famiya Masood, a columnist for The Nation, an English-language Pakistani newspaper and law student at Northwestern University, has published an article that argues that Pakistan needs more patents from its government-funded research. Well, perhaps. But she gets Bayh-Dole wrong on … Continue reading

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Working through an old misrepresentation of Bayh-Dole, 3

I have previously pointed out the University of Rochester’s strange policy statement with regard to commercialization. This is part of Rochester’s new and stinky. A statement currently pops up on the Rochester site that it will be down for a … Continue reading

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Bayh-Dole march-in won’t change drug prices but other things might–2

Now let’s look at alternatives to Bayh-Dole’s march-in procedures to address competition, public access, and prevention of unreasonable use, including price gouging. We will consider two within Bayh-Dole and two outside Bayh-Dole. The Bayh-Dole alternatives are: use the government license … Continue reading

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Bayh-Dole march-in won’t change drug prices but other things might–1

Folks think that somehow Bayh-Dole permits government take over of pharma patents and by doing this, somehow, the price of drugs will necessarily–magically–go down. Let’s work through this idea. Set aside for a moment that many drugs don’t do much … Continue reading

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War and Publification of Medicine Development, 3

Think of it this way, at least simplistically. You are patent counsel for the NIH in 1968. You have no control over how the NIH allocates funding, and the NIH chooses to fund lots of research and declines to fund … Continue reading

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