Category Archives: Innovation

There are no Bayh-Doles in Canada

In a recent hearing held by the Canadian House of Commons Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology, Michael Geist, a law professor at the University of Ottawa, made some valuable remarks, which he has published at his blog. Geist … Continue reading

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The Bush Engine of Technology Innovation

Vannevar Bush argued that it was a proper role for the federal government to support scientific research. This proposition today is regarded as a truth that hardly needs justification. But in Science the Endless Frontier, Bush was not arguing for … Continue reading

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Initial inventors, cumulative development, and the public covenant in federally supported inventions, 2

We are using Steven Anderman’s article “Overplaying the innovation card: The stronger intellectual property rights and competition law” to work through ideas about invention and follow-on development in the context of federal funding for university research and the effect of the Bayh-Dole … Continue reading

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Government Interest Patent Activity 1976 to 2016, Part 4

In a portfolio model, 1 invention in 200 becoming a commercial product is acceptable, if the 1 is a big hit. In an agent model, 1 in 200 is unacceptable and borders on malpractice or fraud unless inventors willingly turn … Continue reading

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Free Competition and Enterprise in Bayh-Dole

One reason that Bayh-Dole is so difficult to parse is that there are multiple levels at work. It’s easier to just say that Bayh-Dole gives universities ownership of inventions made with federal support, and they can do anything they want … Continue reading

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Affordances, Innovation, and University Patents

I first hit affordances in Don Norman’s book The Design of Everyday Things. Here’s some key points: The term affordance refers to the relationship between a physical object and a person . . . . An affordance is a relationship between … Continue reading

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University technology transfer as an import function

Here is Carlo Marco Belfanti, on “Guilds, Patents, and the Circulation of Technical Knowledge“: In 1554 the Republic of Lucca established a special office, the Offizio sopra le Nuove Arti, to undertake the task of “examining the ways of introducing … Continue reading

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Research Monopolies and Development Monopolies

Here is one thing that I don’t understand about the standard distinction between research and development and how all this fits into ideas about commercialization. Let’s say that research produces a result that is immediately useful. Isn’t the research then development? … Continue reading

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Research and Development

In 2 CFR 215 (Circular A-110), we find definitions of research and development (dd): Research and development means all research activities, both basic and applied, and all development activities that are supported at universities, colleges, and other non-profit institutions. This … Continue reading

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Was Vannevar Bush So Wrong?

Over at Science of Science Policy there’s more discussion of Vannevar Bush, this time attributing to Bush the “linear model” of innovation that asserts that basic research leads to discoveries that applied research then prepares for development into commercial products, … Continue reading

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