Category Archives: Innovation

NIST’s “substantially fueled” premise for unleashing innovation

Here is a claim from the opening of a recent NIST report–1234–on “Unleashing American Innovation,” a “draft green paper”: The U.S. innovation system is substantially fueled by the discoveries and inventions arising from federally funded R&D at the Nation’s universities, … Continue reading

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Thanksgiving 2018

It’s Thanksgiving here in the United States. It’s a good time to give thanks to (and for!) all the people who come up with things new and intriguing–whether by accident or design, whether directed or random, whether paid or free, … Continue reading

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Shaping Science

A short version of a Research Enterprise article on Daniel Sarewitz’s “Saving Science” is posted as correspondence at The New Atlantis, where Sarewitz also responds to various comments on his paper. In part, Sarewitz gathers some of those comments into … Continue reading

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Ten Year Note

Ten years ago, on September 4, 2008, I started the Research Enterprise blog. My idea was to use the blog to document what I had learned about university-based technology transfer over 15 years of licensing practice, and to describe ways … Continue reading

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The National Patent Planning Commission argument for government-created private patent monopolies, 3

The National Patent Planning Commission quotes administration officials repeating this same argument. Here’s the Under Secretary of Agriculture (1941): The commercial exploitation of new inventions requires, in many cases, the expenditure of large sums of money. In such a case, … Continue reading

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The National Patent Planning Commission argument for government-created private patent monopolies, 2

We are looking at the National Patent Planning Commission argument that the government should be permitted to grant exclusive patent licenses on inventions that it acquires. The basic position is that it is a good thing that the government should … Continue reading

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The National Patent Planning Commission argument for government-created private patent monopolies, 1

I have been working through reports from the mid 1940s on government ownership of patents. There are a number of arguments against government exploitation of patents, but these arguments clearly failed. What arguments won out? Here’s one, from the National … Continue reading

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Merry Christmas!

Jane Jacobs observed that the purpose of economic life is us. Perhaps that goes as well for holidays–set aside for a moment the organized religion element, if you would–the purpose of Christmas, in a large sense, is us. The purpose … Continue reading

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Continued Employment as Consideration

Here is a nice article that worries whether continued employment is sufficient to create an enforceable obligation to assign inventions to an employer: “Is Continued Employment Enough to Uphold Invention Assignment Agreements?” The brief answer is, yes. Add the qualifications: … Continue reading

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Drift as a city’s economic driver

Some years ago, Jane Jacobs published a series of books that take up the issue of how cities contribute to regional and national economies. In particular, Jacobs argued that a particular kind of city behavior was crucial for a regional … Continue reading

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