Monthly Archives: November 2016

Documented and undocumented technology transfer programs

Recently, the University of California, in an internal report on its technology transfer program, indicated that its commercialization rate was 0.5%–1 invention in 200 got to the point of a commercial product. There was no indication whether those commercial products … Continue reading

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What’s uniform and what should never be, Part 5

If there’s no need for the federal government to make money from patent positions, and the federal government transfers the administration of these patents to universities, then universities also have no need to make money from these patent positions. They … Continue reading

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An Overview of Research Enterprise

I have been writing for Research Enterprise now for a little over eight years. In that time, I have posted 850 articles on technology transfer, intellectual property, and research policy. Here is a map of the main lines of development … Continue reading

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What’s uniform and what should never be, Part 4

[I have expanded the first section to fill out the difference between acquiring the federal government’s right of ownership in subject inventions and the federal government giving up on having an ownership interest in subject inventions–muddling this distinction is at … Continue reading

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What’s uniform and what should never be, Part 3

There are, then, three entry points for the IPA approach re-established by Norm Latker at HEW in 1968. First, an agency may allow a university to acquire rights at the time of contracting at the agency director’s discretion–if doing so is … Continue reading

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What’s uniform and what should never be, Part 2

In 1963, President Kennedy created a government-wide federal policy to address when and how federal agencies might consider allowing patent rights to remain with a contractor–any contractor, not just universities, and under any contract–not just procurement but also grants-in-aid or subventions. From … Continue reading

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What’s uniform and what should never be, Part 1

One of the common description of the Bayh-Dole Act is that it established “uniform” federal patent policy: Enacted on December 12, 1980, the Bayh-Dole Act (P.L. 96-517, Patent and Trademark Act Amendments of 1980) created a uniform patent policy among the many federal agencies that … Continue reading

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The Llorts of Bayh-Dole

In July, Setareh Samii published “The Importance of the Bayh-Dole Act” at The Catalyst, a web site operated by PhRMA. Samii argues that Bayh-Dole “created a framework for technology transfer that helped rejuvenate the American economy.” Samii then proceeds to … Continue reading

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University Bayh-Dole Drug Price Gravy Licking

The financial sweet spot for drug development is to find compounds that make widely occurring acute conditions chronic. That’s a lifetime of payments following diagnosis. And really good for the twenty-year monopoly that permits pricing “whatever the market [for pain … Continue reading

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How can universities demonstrate they aren’t patent trolls?

Let’s say, just for the sake of argument, that university administrators at places like Caltech don’t want to be labelled patent trolls. What might make it clear that universities are not just one more set of patent trolls? “We’re not … Continue reading

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