Monthly Archives: September 2015

How Bayh-Dole failed to protect faculty inventors (from university administrators)

  [Now with some revisions in the second paragraph that on reflection were worth making.] There are a number of things wrong with the Bayh-Dole Act, such as the lack of accountability for the disposition of privately held patents on … Continue reading

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The Road to Redemption

Here’s a story in today’s Seattle Times about AnswerDash, a company formed by students and faculty at the University of Washington’s Information School (my emphasis): The company, founded in 2012, has raised more than $5 million, including a $2.9 million … Continue reading

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Come in from the cold

In The Economist for August 8, there’s an article on the problem of patents. The article questions the utility of patents and points to a number of situations in which patents appear to block innovation or have nothing to do … Continue reading

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The Most Innovative Public University in the World

The University of Washington ran a press release a couple of days ago announcing that Thomson Reuters has named UW the “most innovative public university in the world.” A reader might think that the ranking methodology includes the number of startups, … Continue reading

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The Legal Context of University IP, Part 2 Revisited

In 2010, the National Academies and the National Research Council published a commissioned a report–The Legal Context of University Intellectual Property and Technology Transfer by Sean O’Connor, Gregory D. Graff, and David E. Winickoff. Here are comments on the findings of … Continue reading

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The Legal Context of University IP, Part 1 Revisited

In 2010, the National Academies and the National Research Council published a commissioned a report–The Legal Context of University Intellectual Property and Technology Transfer by Sean O’Connor, Gregory D. Graff, and David E. Winickoff. The report lists 45 findings and expands … Continue reading

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More problems with the wild success of Bayh-Dole

There are plenty of jewels in Gene Quinn’s recent opinion piece. Perhaps the readers at IP Watchdog are all true believers in Bayh-Dole, so Mr. Quinn does not feel much need to work hard at what he writes. Here at Research … Continue reading

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F-B-D.

Gene Quinn’s opinion piece got me thinking some more about how Bayh-Dole really must go. I agree with Quinn’s analysis of some critics of Bayh-Dole. The criticisms Mr. Quinn criticizes are indeed silly. There are much more damning weaknesses in … Continue reading

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Bayh-Dole is a dismal failure. Here’s why.

At IP Watchdog, Gene Quinn has published an opinion piece on the virtues of the Bayh-Dole Act–“Patent policy is just too important for subterfuge and academic folly.” The impression he leaves is that anyone critical of Bayh-Dole is irrational, teaching … Continue reading

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