Monthly Archives: April 2013

University patent policies then and now

Some patent policies in effect in 1962, with the date of most recent revision. From the preamble to the New Mexico State University research and patent policy, 1960: Discoveries and inventions which appear as a natural product of original work … Continue reading

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The University Inventor's Prayer

One of the staples of university technology transfer discussions is the “valley of death” meme.  There are plenty of depictions of this terrible place, if one does a Google image search.  It’s just that I’m not sure that this place … Continue reading

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Administrative patent policy swarming

I have been intrigued by a story David Byrne tells in How Music Works.   Byrne needed three dancers as part of an ensemble, so they held an audition that had fifty dancers.  The choreographer had the dancers do an exercise … Continue reading

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The non-patenting of the first digital computer

In Turing’s Cathedral, George Dyson provides an account of the creation of the first digital computer at the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton.   John von Neumann, leading the effort, in 1946 came up with a patent policy for the … Continue reading

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1962 University of Arizona patent policy allowed inventors to choose their agent

In Neal Stephenson’s Anathem, in an earth-history parallel but someways upside downed from our own, there is an order of “avouts” or knowledge-monks called Lorites.  A Lorite is “A member of a Order founded by Saunt Lora, who believed that … Continue reading

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Palmer's 1962 Guide to University Patent Policies

Archie Palmer has a helpful discussion on the treatment of invention ownership in the 147 universities with formalized patent policies, as of 1962.  Palmer’s work is important, because for thirty years, Palmer was Archie Appleseed of university patent policies.  He … Continue reading

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Shop use as soulcraft

Here is the opening sentence to Archie Palmer’s 1962 examination of university patent policies: Research, whether conducted in the library, the laboratory or the shop, is an essential and integral element of an effective educational program. This sentence caught my … Continue reading

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Present Assignment Shakedown

That’s a nice invention ya got there, Prof.  Pity if something were to happen to it. Using a present assignment would not have saved Stanford’s position in Stanford v Roche.  There are too many other circumstances that work against Stanford.  … Continue reading

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Why is the 1995 NIH "20-20" Guide Still Up?

At the University of Cincinnati Intellectual Property web site we find this NIH Guide, the 20 Questions About Extramural Invention Reporting: The Bayh-Dole Act encourages researchers to patent and market their inventions by guaranteeing patent rights. The Bayh-Dole Act does … Continue reading

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Expenses (including payments to inventors)

Stanford’s claim on a quarter billion dollars in royalties in Stanford v Roche turned on the little word “of” in the construction “of a contractor” as part of the definition of subject invention.  “Of” it turns out, has its ordinary … Continue reading

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