Monthly Archives: December 2011

Limits of Causation Models in Technology Transfer

There is an article by Jonah Lehrer in the latest Wired magazine that is worth the read.  It’s called “Trials and Errors” with the subtitle “Dead-end experiments, useless drugs, unnecessary surgery. Why Science is Failing Us.” Lehrer discusses the growing … Continue reading

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Compulsory IP Taking and Public Universities

Personal ownership of inventions is a matter of federal common law and a personal right to a patent on that invention is established in the US Constitution. The Bill of Rights also provides that the government cannot take property without … Continue reading

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The Effect of University Monopoly Licensing in 3d Printing

Inkjet powder 3d printers provide a useful case study for the effects of university exclusive patent licensing.  In the early 90s, MIT researchers developed inkjet 3d printers.  They built off much of the technology platform used for selective laser sintering … Continue reading

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Shanzhai Rules

Over at the LinkedIn Post-Industrial Design group, there’s a little discussion started by Matt Sinclair on a report called The Future of Open Fabrication from the Institute For the Future.   The report calls out the Shanzhai approach to manufacturing in … Continue reading

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Feeling Festive and Innovation Optimistic

The year is winding down and it’s holiday time.   Merry Christmas, happy holidays, and festive solstice! Folks will have different perspectives on research enterprise and innovation, and its worth having some frank and firm arguing about it, but the whole … Continue reading

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What SvR Means: Five Key Points

What does Stanford v Roche mean for research enterprise? 1.  Federal university research innovation policy favors freedom over compulsory practices. Bayh-Dole rolled back agency compulsory invention ownership policies to create a powerful group of expert, university-based, independent investigators with access … Continue reading

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Rev Proc 2007-47’s Nonsensical Attack on Bayh-Dole

Many public universities use tax-free bonds to construct their research buildings, and when they do, they run afoul of the Tax Reform Act of 1986.  That law places a strange set of restrictions on research conducted in these buildings and … Continue reading

Posted in Bayh-Dole, Policy, Technology Transfer | 2 Comments

Innovation Fail: autocracy + bureaucracy

I have yet to see a reasoned argument supporting what many university technology transfer officers appear to favor: that the best innovation policy is autocracy + bureaucracy That’s what 70 of ’em argued in their amicus brief in Stanford v. … Continue reading

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The Agreement on Top of the Agreement

Karen White, a veteran of technology transfer and research development, has started a blog on innovation and technology transfer called Almost White Papers.   In a recent post, she makes a great point: Technology transfer does work when the parties to … Continue reading

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Free Agency

It has been a year and half since Arundeep Pradhan published his “defense” of the AUTM status quo in Business Week. If one looks at the comments to that article, one finds a string of pearls of insiders commending the … Continue reading

Posted in History, Metrics, Policy, Technology Transfer | 1 Comment