Monthly Archives: September 2010

A Template in a Teacup

Templates are a staple of licensing. They range from past agreements to form book illustrations to model agreements to standardized agreements for specific transactions. One starts with templates to build agreements for specific situations by versioning for local circumstances. There … Continue reading

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Grail is a bit much

I’ve been working through the Carolina Express license again, given all the attention folks are giving it. For the most part it’s another exclusive patent license, biased toward biotech conventions and assuming Bayh-Dole conventions, with the usual warts. What is … Continue reading

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The Most Efficient License

The most efficient license is to take whatever is offered. The next most efficient is to dictate the terms and ignore everyone until someone takes your deal as is. Either way, the point of efficiency is not to be bothered. … Continue reading

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Issues with Faculty Startups

Some years ago, we were asked, why not just take a set %–like 5%–of equity in research startups, and make it a standard patent license without any running royalties on sales? Wouldn’t that be even simpler? At the time, it … Continue reading

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Exclusive "Express" Start up Licenses

There’s some press chatter around about “express” licenses. Here and here and here. We were using this sort of approach a decade ago to manage non-exclusive licensing programs for specific projects. The idea is, for a given technology base, use … Continue reading

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The Room at the Bottom

Feynman made a famous talk on studying the small things of physics, arguing there was “plenty of the room at the bottom” for research. The same may be true for university research and technology transfer relative to markets, industry, and … Continue reading

Posted in 3D Printing, Bayh-Dole, Technology Transfer | 1 Comment

The Meat of It

As I reread the 40+ university amicus brief, I tried to understand what would cause such mass hysteria among such a usually undemonstrative group. Clearly, they believe something they do is under attack, or Bayh-Dole is, and they got out … Continue reading

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It Just Doesn't Get Any Better Than This

[I’ve revised this a few times. I will leave it now. It’s intended to reflect passion and disbelief at the magnitude of this situation. It is not a mild difference of viewpoint couched in odd technicalities of a law most … Continue reading

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Some More Roche Comments

Roche’s response to Stanford University’s petition for a writ of certiorari is posted here. My read of it is, they got the Bayh-Dole piece of it right. See Section I.A (Bayh-Dole was not intended to be a tool for universities … Continue reading

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Who To Listen To?

I’m sort of fascinated by the academics doing surveys to ascertain technology transfer practice. They don’t actually sully themselves by observing practice–that would take too long, be expensive, and would compromise some degree of (what to call it?)–oh–innocence–perspective. Survey is … Continue reading

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